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Here you can find Pictures and Information for the differnt designs of the 50 States Quarters

 
 

A - F         G - L         M - N         O - Z

 

Georgia

The selected design incorporates several symbols associated with this traditional, yet very diverse southern state. The selected design prominently features the peach within the silhouetted outline of the state. Live Oak sprigs border the central design paying homage to the official state tree, the Live Oak. And if you ever need to know the Georgia state motto, simply look across the top of the design, where the words "Wisdom, Justice, Moderation," grace a hanging banner.

 

 

Hawaii

The fifth and final quarter-dollar coin released in 2008 honors the State of Hawaii, and is the 50th and last coin in the United States Mint’s popular 50 State Quarters® Program. The reverse of Hawaii’s quarter features Hawaiian monarch King Kamehameha I stretching his hand toward the eight major Hawaiian Islands. Inscriptions are the state motto "UA MAU KE EA O KA ‘ĀINA I KA PONO," ("The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness"), "Hawaii" and "1959."

 

 

Idaho

Idaho 50 State Quarter

The reverse of Idaho's quarter features the Peregrine Falcon imposing its presence above an outline of the State of Idaho. The coin bears the inscriptions "Esto Perpetua" (the State motto which means, "May it be Forever"), "Idaho" and "1890." The Peregrine Falcon is one of the fastest birds in the world. Once on the endangered species list, it can now be found throughout Idaho and the United States because of conservation efforts.

 

 

Illinois

The Illinois quarter design depicts a young Abraham Lincoln within the outline of the state. A farm scene and the Chicago skyline appear on the left and to the right of the state's outline. Twenty-one stars border the coin, signifying Illinois as the 21st state to be admitted into the Union on December 3, 1818. "The Prairie State," also commonly known as the "Land of Lincoln," pays tribute to our nation's 16th president.

 

 

Indiana

The Indiana quarter represents the state pride in the famous Indianapolis 500 race. The design features the image of a racecar superimposed on an outline of the state with the inscription "Crossroads of America." The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is a 2.5 mile track built in 1909 for automotive research purposes. While the track was and is used for research, it is best known for hosting auto races, most famously, the Indy 500.

 

 

Iwoa

The Iowa quarter design features a one-room schoolhouse with a teacher and students planting a tree, and the inscriptions "Foundation in Education" and "Grant Wood." The design is based on "Arbor Day," a painting by Grant Wood, who was born near Anamosa, Iowa. Iowans have had a commitment to education since the State's earliest days. When Iowa became a state in 1846, it already had a number of rural country schools in each of its counties.

 

 

Kansas

Kansas marks the 34th coin to be issued in the 50 State Quarters® Program, and features a buffalo and sunflower motif, emblematic of the State’s history and natural beauty. The Kansas commemorative quarter incorporates two of the State’s most beloved symbols, the state animal and flower, the buffalo and the sunflower. Each of these two design elements is a visual reminder of our Nation’s heartland. They feature prominently in the history of the territory, and both were found in abundance throughout the State in the middle of the 19th century when Kansas gained its statehood.

 

 

Kentucky

The Kentucky quarter shows the stately mansion, Federal Hill, with an inscription that reads, "My Old Kentucky Home." A thoroughbred racehorse is positioned behind a fence in the foreground of the quarter. Kentucky was the first state on the western frontier to join the Union and is one of four states to call itself a "commonwealth." Kentucky is home of the longest running annual horse race in the country, the Kentucky Derby.

 

 

Louisiana

The Louisiana quarter displays the image of Louisiana's state bird -- the pelican, a trumpet with musical notes, and the outline of the Louisiana Purchase territory, along with the inscription "Louisiana Purchase."Thomas Jefferson bought the Louisiana Territory from Napoleon Bonaparte in 1803 for $15 million. Dubbed the "greatest real estate deal in history" the Louisiana Purchase added thirteen new states to the Union, nearly doubling its size and making it one of the largest countries in the world.

 
 
  
Quarter Descriptions from the U.S. Mint
 

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