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Here you can find Pictures and Information for the differnt designs of the 50 States Quarters

 
 

A - F         G - L         M - N         O - Z

 

Main

Maine became the 23rd state to be admitted into the Union, as part of the Missouri Compromise on March 15, 1820. The Maine quarter design incorporates a rendition of the Pemaquid Point Light atop a granite coast and of a schooner at sea. Pemaquid Point Light is located in New Harbor, and marks the entrance to Muscongus Bay and Johns Bay.

 

 

Maryland

Through its new quarter, our 7th state shares its pride for the honored Maryland Statehouse. A distinctive building dating back to 1772, it features the country's largest wooden dome built without nails. Besides housing Maryland's colonial legislature, it was also crucial to our national history. From 1783-1784, the Maryland Statehouse served as the nation's first peacetime capital. The Treaty of Paris was ratified here, officially ending the Revolutionary War. A treasure preserved, the Statehouse continues as the country's oldest state capital building still in legislative use.

 

 

Massachusetts

The Massachusetts quarter features a design of "The Minuteman," a famous statue that stands guard at The Minuteman National Historical Park in Concord, Massachusetts.The selected design captures a piece of the Bay State's exceptional history. The Minutemen played a big role in protecting our nation, as they rallied together to help defeat the British during the Revolutionary War.

 

 

Minnesota

The design features a tree-lined lake with two people fishing, a loon on the water, and a textured outline of the State surrounding its nickname, "Land of 10,000 Lakes." Minnesota actually contains more than 15,000 such bodies of water whose total shoreline exceeds 90,000 miles - more than California, Hawaii and Florida combined. It is also the home of the headwaters of the mighty Mississippi River.

 

 

Michigan

The Michigan quarter depicts the outline of the State and the Great Lakes system. The quarter is inscribed "Great Lakes State." As indicated by the State's nickname, much of Michigan's history is tied to the Great Lakes - Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario. These are five of the world's largest lakes that, together, encompass more than 38,000 square miles and form the largest body of fresh water in the world. Michigan is the only State that borders four of the five Great Lakes, more than any other state.

 

 

Mississippi

The Mississippi quarter showcases the beauty and elegance of the state flower, combining the blossoms and leaves of two magnolias with the inscription "The Magnolia State." The magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol, is strongly associated with the South, where the flower became enormously popular after it was introduced from Asia.

 

 

Missouri

Missouri became the 24th state on August 10, 1821, as a part of the Missouri Compromise. The Missouri quarter depicts Lewis and Clark’s historic return to St. Louis down the Missouri River, with the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (Gateway Arch) in the background. The quarter is inscribed "Corps of Discovery 1804-2004." While much of the state's history is tied to the mighty rivers that flow through it, the "Show Me State" got its nickname because of the devotion of its people to simple common sense.

 

 

Montana

Montana 50 State Quarter

The reverse of Montana's quarter features a bison skull depicted above the diverse Montana landscape with the inscription "Big Sky Country." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Montana" and "1889." The bison skull is a powerful symbol, sacred to many of Montana's American Indian tribes. This symbol can be seen across the State on schools, businesses and license plates, and reflects the rich native tradition of Montana, which was once home to large tribes such as the Crow and the Northern Cheyenne.

 

 

Nebraska

Nebraska's quarter depicts an ox-drawn covered wagon carrying pioneers in the foreground and Chimney Rock, the natural wonder that rises from the valley of North Platte River, measuring 445 feet from base to tip. The sun is in full view behind the wagon. The coin also bears the inscriptions "Nebraska," "Chimney Rock" and "1867." Chimney Rock was designated a National Historic Site on August 9, 1956, and is maintained and operated by the Nebraska State Historical Society.

 

 

Nevada

Nevada's quarter depicts a trio of wild mustangs, the sun rising behind snow-capped mountains, bordered by sagebrush and a banner that reads "The Silver State." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Nevada" and "1864." Nevada is home to one of the greatest mineral discoveries, famously known as the Comstock Lode. Nevada is home to more than 50 percent of the Nation's wild horses. The wild horses dominate the Great Basin in the vast deserts and the more than 150 mountain ranges.

 

 

New Hampshire

The New Hampshire quarter honors one of the state's most unique natural attractions, "The Old Man of the Mountain." The state motto, "Live free or die," and nine stars, signifying the fact that New Hampshire was the ninth state to ratify the Constitution, complete the design. "The Old Man of the Mountain" was a distinctive rock formation on Mt. Cannon in the Franconia Notch gateway to northern New Hampshire.

 

 

New Jersey

The New Jersey quarter depicts General George Washington and members of the Colonial Army crossing the Delaware River en route to very important victories during the Revolutionary War. The design is based on the 1851 painting by Emmanuel Leutze, "Washington Crossing the Delaware," which currently hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

 

 

New Mexico

Coming in 2008

 

 

New York

The quarter's design features the Statue of Liberty superimposed over an outline of the state along with the inscription "Gateway to Freedom." Also incorporated into the state outline is a line tracing the Hudson River and the route of the Erie Canal. This final New York design celebrates the "Empire State" as a point of entry for millions of immigrants seeking the political freedom and democracy that American citizenship provides.

 

 

North Carolina

This quarter highlights the famous 1903 photograph of the "First Flight."The North Carolina quarter commemorates the historic feat that took place on December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina with the first successful flight of a heavier-than-air, self-propelled flying machine. The craft, called the Flyer, traveled a distance of approximately 37 meters (120 feet) on its first flight and soared even further as one of the most significant human achievements in history.

 

 

North Dakota

The North Dakota quarter depicts a pair of grazing American bison in the foreground with a sunset view of the rugged buttes and canyons that help define the State's Badlands region in the background. The coin's design also bears the inscriptions "North Dakota" and "1889." President Theodore Roosevelt founded the United States Forest Service and signed the Antiquities Act in 1906, which was designed to preserve and protect unspoiled places such as his beloved North Dakota Badlands, now known as Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

 
 
 
Quarter Descriptions from the U.S. Mint
 

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