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Here you can find Pictures and Information for the differnt designs of the 50 States Quarters

 
 

A - F         G - L         M - N         O - Z

 

Ohio

The Ohio quarter honors the state's contribution to the history of aviation, depicting an early aircraft and an astronaut, superimposed as a group on the outline of the state. The design also includes the inscription "Birthplace of Aviation Pioneers." The claim to this inscription is well justified -- the history making astronauts Neil Armstrong and John Glenn were both born in Ohio, as was Orville Wright, co-inventor of the airplane. Orville and his brother, Wilbur Wright, also built and tested one of their early aircraft, the 1905 Flyer III, in Ohio.

 

 

Oklahoma

Oklahoma 50 State Quarter

The Oklahoma quarter features an image of the State bird, the Scissortail Flycatcher, in flight with its distinctive tail feathers spread. The bird is soaring over the State wildflower, the Indian Blanket, backed by a field of similar wildflowers. The coin’s design also bears the inscriptions "Oklahoma" and "1907." The depiction of Indian Blanket (or Gaillardia) symbolizes the State’s rich Native American heritage and native long grass prairies that are abundant in wildlife.

 

 

Oregon

Oregon's coin design features a portion of Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States, viewed from the south-southwest rim. The design incorporates Wizard Island, as well as Watchman and Hillman Peaks on the lake’s rim and conifers. At 1,949 feet, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States and the seventh deepest in the world, and has a record clarity depth of 134 feet. President Theodore Roosevelt established Crater Lake National Park in 1902. It is the 6th oldest national park in the country.

 

 

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania quarter depicts the statue "Commonwealth," an outline of the state, the state motto, and a keystone. This design was chosen to further help educate people about the origins of our second state, founded on December 12, 1787. The statue "Commonwealth," designed by New York sculptor Roland Hinton Perry, is a bronze-gilded 14' 6" high female form that has topped Pennsylvania's state capitol dome in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania since May 25, 1905.

 

 

Rhode Island

The design features a vintage sailboat gliding through Rhode Island's famous Narragansett Bay, and an image of the Pell Bridge in the background, with the design showcasing Rhode Island's most popular sport—sailing. With more than 400 miles of coastline, Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union, has more than 100 fresh water and salt water beaches. Known as the "sailing capital" of the world, Rhode Island was home to the America's Cup for more than 50 years.

 

 

South Carolina

The South Carolina quarter shows key state symbols- a Palmetto Tree, the Carolina Wren and the Yellow Jessamine. An outline of South Carolina, the nickname "The Palmetto State" and a star indicating the capital, Columbia, form the quarter’s background. The Carolina Wren, the state bird, and the Yellow Jessamine, the state flower, are native throughout South Carolina; the importance of the Palmetto Tree, the state tree, dates back to the Revolutionary War.

 

 

South Dakota

The fifth and final commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors South Dakota, the "Mount Rushmore State." The South Dakota quarter features an image of the State bird, a Chinese ring-necked pheasant, in flight above a depiction of the Mount Rushmore National Monument, featuring the faces of four American Presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The design is bordered by heads of wheat.

 

 

Tennessee

The Tennessee quarter celebrates the state's contributions to our nation's musical heritage. The design incorporates musical instruments and a score with the inscription "Musical Heritage." Three stars represent Tennessee's three regions and the instruments symbolize each region's distinct musical style. The fiddle represents the Appalachian music of east Tennessee, the trumpet stands for the blues of west Tennessee for which Memphis is famous, and the guitar is for central Tennessee, home to Nashville, the capital of country music.

 

 

Texas

On December 29, 1845, Texas became the 28th state to be admitted into the Union. The quarter's reverse design incorporates an outline of the State with a star superimposed on the outline and the inscription, "The Lone Star State." The lariat encircling the design is symbolic of the cattle and cowboy history of Texas, as well as the frontier spirit that tamed the land.

 

 

Utah

Utah 50 State Quarter

The reverse of Utah's quarter features two locomotives moving toward the golden spike that joined the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads, linking East to West and transforming both the Utah Territory and the Nation with the inscription "Crossroads of the West." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Utah" and "1896." On May 10, 1869, two steam locomotives met at Promontory, Utah, for the "Joining of the Rails Ceremony," at which the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads completed the transcontinental route. The event was crucial to the development of the American West because it made cross-country travel more convenient and economical.

 

 

Vermont

features Camel's Hump Mountain with an image of maple trees with sap buckets in the forefront. The design honors the "Green Mountain State," the first state admitted to the Union after the original 13 colonies. Vermont is most famous for its skiing and the production of maple sugar and syrup. Until the 1800s when cane sugar was introduced, Americans relied on Vermont's maple sugar for much of its sugar supply. Also featured on the quarter is Camel's Hump Mountain in the northern half of Vermont's Green Mountains.

 

 

Virginia

The Virginia quarter Virginia, our nation's first permanent English settlement. Jamestown turns 400 years old in 2007. The selected design features the three ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. These ships brought the first English settlers to Jamestown. On April 10, 1606, King James I of England chartered the Virginia Company to encourage colonization in the New World. The first expedition, consisting of the three ships depicted on the quarter, embarked from London on December 20, 1606.

 

 

Washington

Washington 50 State Quarter

The reverse of Washington's quarter features a king salmon breaching the water in front of majestic Mount Rainier. The coin bears the inscriptions "The Evergreen State," "Washington" and "1889." Mount Rainier is an active volcano encased in more than 35 square miles of snow and glacial ice. It is the symbolic bridge between the eastern and western parts of the State. The salmon is another important symbol of Washington.

 

 

West Virgina

This coin captures the scenic beauty of the State with its depiction of the New River and the New River Gorge Bridge. The coin bears the inscription "New River Gorge." The design chosen to represent West Virginia is one that combines the natural physical beauty of the State and the triumph of the human intellect exemplified by the engineering wonder that is the New River Gorge Bridge. At 3,030 feet long and 69 feet wide, the bridge is the world’s largest steel span and the second highest bridge in the United States.

 

 

Wisconsin

On May 29, 1848, Wisconsin became the 30th state to be admitted into the Union. The Wisconsin design depicts an agricultural theme featuring a cow, a round of cheese and an ear of corn. The design also bears an inscription of the State motto, "Forward." Wisconsin adopted the State motto, "Forward," in 1851, reflecting Wisconsin's continuous drive to be a national leader. Wisconsin is considered "America's Dairy Land" with production of over 15 percent of the Nation's milk. Wisconsin also produces over 350 different varieties, types and styles of award-winning cheeses – more than any other state.

 

 

Wyoming

Wyoming 50 State Quarter

The reverse of Wyoming's quarter features a bucking horse and rider with the inscriptions "The Equality State," "Wyoming" and "1890." The bucking horse and rider symbolize Wyoming's Wild West heritage. "Buffalo Bill" Cody personified this in his traveling Wild West show. First settled by fur trappers, Fort Laramie, Wyoming, later became a popular destination for pioneers traveling the Oregon Trail.

 
 
 
Quarter Descriptions from the U.S. Mint
 

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